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Covid-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has left many people uncertain and concerned about what precautions to take, and the implications in the workplace.

We are closely monitoring Coronavirus and following the current guidance from the leading government and health authorities to ensure we are taking the right actions to protect our members, employees, and community.

We want to be sure that you have every resource at your disposal as you navigate this uncertain time and we will continue to monitor this evolving situation and will keep you informed of future updates.

For the most current and updated information, please see the City of Long Beach's Economic Development business support page on COVID-19: http://longbeach.gov/economicdevelopment/covid-19-business-support/


The Chamber team is here to assist you during this crisis. If you have any questions, please click here to contact the appropriate staff member.


 

Business Resources and Economic Assistance

Federal Resources

As part of an end-of-year pandemic relief package, Congress has passed several changes to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and created a “Second Draw” PPP for small businesses who have exhausted their initial loan. Other changes impact eligibility for initial PPP loans, the loan forgiveness process, and the tax treatment of PPP loans.

What's New?

    • Tax Treatment: The new law overturns the IRS ruling and provides that regular business expenses paid for with PPP loan proceeds shall be deductible for tax purposes (applies to past and future loans). 
    • Expanded List of Expenses Qualifying for Forgiveness: The list of expenses that PPP funds can be used for that qualify for loan forgiveness has been expanded to include: 
      • “operations expenses” defined as payments for business software and cloud computing services and other human resources and accounting needs that facilitate business operations; 
      • “supplier costs” defined as payments to a supplier for goods that are essential to the operations of the borrower pursuant to a contract or purchase order in effect before the PPP loan is disbursed or with respect to perishable goods, in effect at any time; 
      • “worker protection expenses” defined as operating or capital expenditures to comply with public health guidance related to COVID-19, including things like drive-through windows and sneeze guards and the purchase of personal protective equipment (PPE); and 
      • “covered property damage costs” defined as costs related to property damage or looting due to public disturbances in 2020 that are not covered by insurance or other compensation. 
      • Remember: It is still the case that not more than 40% of the forgiven amount can be for non-payroll costs, which may limit how much of your loan can be forgiven. 
    • Loan Forgiveness Reduction: If you also received an EIDL grant, your PPP loan forgiveness will no longer be reduced by the amount of the grant. 
    • Loan Forgiveness Period: The period for which expenses count toward loan forgiveness will begin on the date of loan origination and end on a date of your choosing that is between 8 and 24 weeks after origination. 
    • Simplified Application: If your loan was for less than $150,000, there will be a simplified one-page application process for loan forgiveness.

If You Exhausted Your First Loan: 

    • The brand new “Second Draw” program is for small businesses, non-profits, sole proprietors, and independent contractors who have exhausted their initial PPP loan. The program will make new loans through March 31, 2021 or until the new funding is exhausted.
    • Eligibility: You are eligible for a second draw loan if you have exhausted your first PPP loan and
      • (1) you have less than 300 employees, and
      • (2) you have experienced a greater than 25% reduction in gross receipts during the first, second, third, or fourth quarter in 2020 relative to the same quarter in 2019.
    • Entities with significant ties to China are ineligible for a second draw loan.
    • Loan Amount: The maximum loan amount is the average monthly payroll costs for the entity during the 12 months prior to the loan or, at the election of the borrower, 2019 multiplied by 2.5 (or 3.5 for employers in the accommodation and food service industry).
    • Seasonal employers utilize average monthly payroll costs for a 12-week period between February 15, 2019 and February 15, 2020.
    • A loan may not exceed $2 million.
    • Loan Forgiveness: The amount of loan that can be forgiven is the lesser of:
      • Costs incurred or expenditures made between the date of the origination of the loan and ending on a date of your choosing that is between 8 and 24 weeks after origination for: (a) payroll costs, (b) qualifying mortgage interest or rent obligations, (c) covered utility costs, (d) covered operations costs, (e) covered property damage, (f) covered supplier costs, and (g) covered worker protection expenditures; or Payroll costs for the same period divided by 0.60 (this serves as a cap on the total loan forgiveness to ensure that at least 60% of the total amount forgiven is for payroll costs).
    • Like original PPP loans, the amount of loan forgiveness can be reduced if the borrower has (1) reduced the number of employees or (2) employee salaries by more than 25%. However, the same safe harbors that apply to original PPP loans apply to Second Draw loans. Learn more about these Safe Harbors in our Guide for PPP Loan Forgiveness.
    • Set-Asides: $25 billion is set aside for employers with 10 or fewer employees or for loans less than $250,000 for entities located in a low-income neighborhood

First Time Applying for a PPP Loan: 

    • For new PPP applicants, the loan process will largely remain the same (check out our original PPP Guide) with a few major changes:
      • The PPP program is open through March 31, 2021 or until the new funding is exhausted.
      • If you are a 501(c)(6), a local news media organization, or a housing cooperative you may be newly eligible for a loan.
      • You may qualify even if you took advantage of the Employee Retention Tax Credit.
      • If you are a publicly traded company, you are now prohibited from receiving a loan.
      • The maximum loan amount is now $2 million (was $10 million).
      • Group insurance payment can be included in your payroll costs when determining your maximum loan amount (see Step 3 in our original Guide).
      • If you are a seasonal employer, you have greater flexibility in picking the 12-week period between February 15, 2019 and February 15, 2020 used to determine your payroll costs and thus your maximum loan amount.
      • New borrowers have until the end of the covered period of their loan (up to 24 weeks after origination) to restore a reduction in their number of employees or reduced wages in order to avoid having their loan forgiveness reduced. Note: The safe harbors for when an employer cannot find qualified employees or where complying with COVID related safety measurers prevents a return to February 2020 levels of business activity and staffing remain in effect. Learn more in our Guide for PPP Loan Forgiveness.
    • Set-Asides: $35 billion is set-aside for first time borrowers and $15 billion is set aside for employers with 10 or fewer employees or for loans less than $250,000 for entities located in a low-income neighborhood.
    • Remember: The other changes regarding eligible uses of PPP funds and loan forgiveness discussed above will also apply to your new loan. (top)

SBA will forgive loans if all employee retention criteria are met, and the funds are used for eligible expenses.

    • PPP loans have an interest rate of 1%.
    • Loans issued prior to June 5 have a maturity of 2 years. Loans issued after June 5 have a maturity of 5 years.
    • Loan payments will be deferred for borrowers who apply for loan forgiveness until SBA remits the borrower's loan forgiveness amount to the lender. If a borrower does not apply for loan forgiveness, payments are deferred 10 months after the end of the covered period for the borrower’s loan forgiveness (either 8 weeks or 24 weeks).
    • No collateral or personal guarantees are required.
    • Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees.

How to Apply:

    • You can apply through any existing SBA 7(a) lender or through any federally insured depository institution, and federally insured credit union that is participating. Other regulated lenders will be available to make these loans once they are approved and enrolled in the program. You should consult with your local lender as to whether it is participating in the program.
  • Expanded Employee Retention Tax Credit

    • The new law significantly expands the employee retention tax credit beginning on January 1, 2021. The credit expires on June 30, 2021. The prior credit was 50% on $10,000 in qualified wages for the whole year (or a maximum of $5,000 per employee). The new credit is 70% on $10,000 in wages per quarter (or a maximum $14,000 per employee through June 30th).

    • The new law also expands which employers are eligible. Prior to the new law, the employee retention tax credit applied only to an employer who experienced a decline in gross receipts of more than 50% in a quarter compared to the same quarter in 2019. Eligibility is now expanded to include employers who experienced a decline of more than 20%.

    • In addition, the employee cap under which it is easier to claim the tax credit has been raised to 500 employees from 100 employees. Now, employers with 500 or fewer employees can claim the credit for wages to paid to employees irrespective of whether the employee is providing services.

    • Employers can now also receive both the Employee Retention Tax Credit and a PPP loan, just not to cover the same payroll expenses.

    • Remember: This is a refundable tax credit. See the Chamber’s original Guide to the ERTC for more information.

  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program (EIDL)

The new law reopens the $10,000 EIDL Grant program. Priority for the full amount of the EIDL grant will be given to small businesses with less than 300 employees, located in low-income neighborhoods, who have experienced a 30% reduction in gross receipts during any 8-week period between March 2, and December 31, 2020 compared to a comparable 8-week period before March 2. If you meet this description and received a grant that is less than $10,000 you can reapply to receive the difference.

Independent contractors, Solopreneurs, Single Member LLC owners are also eligible to apply for Unemployment Insurance, even while applying for PPP and/or EIDL.  

IBank has Finance Programs for Small Businesses (1-750 employees). Click here for more info.


State Resources 

The California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) has started accepting applications for tentative small business hiring credit reservation amounts through an online reservation system.

Qualified small business employers must apply with the CDTFA for a credit reservation. The credit reservations will be allocated to qualified small business employers on a first-come, first-served basis. The reservation system will be available through January 15, 2021. Within 30 days of receiving an application, CDTFA will notify each applicant via email whether a tentative credit reservation has been allocated to them and the amount of the tentative credit reservation.

Please note, this credit only applies to California small businesses that meet the following qualifications:

Employed 100 or fewer employees as of December 31, 2019, and suffered a 50 percent decrease or more in income tax gross receipts (generally, all income less returns and allowances), when comparing second quarter 2020 to second quarter 2019. Example: You had $250,000 in gross receipts for second quarter 2019 and $100,000 in gross receipts for second quarter 2020. The percent of decrease in gross receipts is 60 percent. ($250,000 – $100,000 = $150,000. $150,000 ÷ $250,000 = 0.6 x 100 = 60%)

If you need assistance, please call the CDTFA's Customer Service Center at 1-800-400-7115 (CRS:711). Customer service representatives are available Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Pacific time), except state holidays. If you need assistance with your Franchise Tax Board (FTB) questions, including how to use your credit on your personal or corporate income tax return, please visit the Small Business Hiring Credit webpage located on the FTB website.

Request Tentative Credit Reservation Online Now

Information needed to make your reservation – IMPORTANT

As a reminder, tentative credit reservations are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. The order in which reservations are allocated is based on the date and time when the application is completed and submitted in the system, not on when you begin the application in the system. After submission of your application, you will promptly receive a secure email notification notifying you as to whether a tentative credit reservation has been allocated to you and the amount of the tentative credit reservation.

Governor Newsom and the Legislature announced a package of assistance for small businesses impacted by COVID-19, including $500 million in grants.

    • The Round 1 application deadline has been extended from January 8 to January 13, 2021 at 11:59 p.m.
    • This grant program is not first come, first served, nor a rolling approval process.
    • All applications will be reviewed following the now extended application deadline. The funds will then be disbursed as originally planned to avoid any possible delay to small business owners receiving their grants.
    • To apply click here.

The California Rebuilding Fund is a loan program to support California’s small businesses—especially those located in economically disadvantaged and historically under-banked areas of the state. Businesses who employed 50 or less full-time equivalent employees (FTEs) and had gross revenues of less than $2.5 million or below in 2019 are eligible to apply. Full eligibility requirements are included in the Business Requirements tab.

The loans are flexible, transparent and are designed to help businesses access the capital and advisory services they need to get through these challenging economic times.

To fill out a pre-application and match with a participating community lenderplease click here.

As a part of the Federal CARES Act, the new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program helps unemployed Californians who are business owners, self-employed, independent contractors, have limited work history, and others not usually eligible for regular State Unemployment Insurance benefits. The provisions of the program include: Up to 30 weeks of benefits starting with weeks of unemployment beginning February 2, 2020, through the week ending December 26, 2020, depending on when a person became directly impacted by the pandemic. An additional $600 to each PUA weekly benefit amount a person may be eligible to receive. Only the weeks of a claim between March 20 and July 25 are eligible for the $600 payments. For more information, click on the following link EDD PUA.

CalCAP is a loan loss reserve program for businesses with 1-500 employees, which may provide up to 100% coverage on losses as a result of certain loan defaults. Individual borrowers are limited to a maximum of $2.5 million enrolled over a 3-year period. Contact a Participating Lender to enroll.


County Resources 

Eligible business owners can apply for grant support from FOUND/L.A. Those who meet the eligibility requirements will be entered into a pool of eligible applicants. On designated selection days, grant recipients will be randomly selected from this pool until all funds are expended. The size of the grant will be between $5,000 and $25,000 depending on the size of the business. The second round of applications will open January 11th and accepted until Sunday, January 17th.

The LA County Early Childhood Education COVID-19 Response Team has released the new website to help early childhood educators safely provide critical services to children and families during the pandemic. It also gives families information on safely sending their children back to child care. The new website helps early childhood educators understand guidance and provides best practices for how to adapt their programs and activities to serve children and families safely. It includes information and resources to implement the specific guidance, ensure maximum health and safety of children and staff, and continue to offer high-quality care and education.

The website is also available in Spanish.

PPE made available through the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) in collaboration with the Office of the Small Business Advocate (CalOSBA). The PPE Unite™ program is a joint effort to give small business owners and their employees access to much-needed personal protective gear. This public and private partnership program creates access to PPE, promotes PPE use, and provides additional resources for businesses.

Get your 30 day supply of free Personal Protective Equipment to keep your business compliant and employees safe. Sign up now to get PPE while supplies last. Please note businesses must have 100 or fewer employees, and be located in LA County.

Given the significant financial impact COVID-19 has had on many households, the Department of Consumer and Business Affairs (DCBA) has launched the new Financial Navigators Program to assist LA County residents with their financial concerns.

This no-cost program connects residents with Financial Navigators from DCBA who can help with: managing financial issues, identifying immediate action steps, and accessing additional resources.

How to Get Help From A Financial Navigator: 

    • Visit dcba.lacounty.gov/financial-navigators to complete a short interest form.
    • The interest form will ask you for your name, zip code, language preference, phone and/or email address.
    • Call 800-593-8222 if you need help completing the form.
    • A Financial Navigator will follow-up with you within 48 hours.

What Happens During a Financial Navigation Session: The free session will last between 30 minutes to an hour. A Financial Navigator will ask you a series of questions about your concerns.

Some topics that may be discussed during your session include: Prioritizing payments for expenses like housing, food, and insurance; Maximizing income, through accessing unemployment benefits, emergency loans and other public benefits; Managing debt by providing guidance on contacting and negotiating with creditors; Avoiding scams.

LA County residents may visit https://dcba.lacounty.gov/financial-navigators/ to get more information on the program and sign up for a financial navigation session by completing an Interest Form. Please note that while Financial Navigators will provide personalized guidance, they do not provide direct financial assistance such as cash or loans. They are also not long-term counselors who provide ongoing financial assistance.


City Resources 

The City has extended the waiver of penalties related to the payment of any license taxes as well as health, fire and business licensing fees issued from March 16, 2020, to March 31, 2021. Any bills issued during this period should still be paid in a timely manner if at all possible, but no penalty will accrue until after March 31, 2021. Additionally, the City will offer a Business License Fee Grant to offset the cash flow drain of business license fees for qualified full-service independent restaurants that have been closed or materially restricted in operation and demonstrate major financial hardship as a result of the City’s Health Order. For more information, business owners can email lbbiz@longbeach.gov or call 562-570-6211.

The City of Long Beach launched SafeBiz, a web-interface which allows businesses, which may open according to the “Safer at Home” order to self-certify that they are committed to re-opening their business safely. Read more.

Kiva Long Beach Loan Program: Kiva Long Program is a creative online crowd-lending program that is designed to support Long Beach small businesses. Loans up to $15,000 are available at a zero percent interest rate; approved borrowers may access a grace period of up to 6-months, loan proceeds may go toward business expenses, such as personnel, rent, supplies/materials, utilities, professional services, and more; all loan applications are reviewed by Kiva, a nonprofit organization; approved loans on Kiva’s online crowd-lending platform have 30 days to successfully raise the entire loan; 25 Long Beach businesses have benefited from this program. To get started, potential borrowers should contact BusinessDevelopment@longbeach.gov or 562-570-4249. 

City of Long Beach Emergency Microloan Program: The Emergency Microloan Program is designed to support Long Beach businesses and non-profits with 5 or less employees that have been financially burdened by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Between $2,500 to $10,000 is available for small businesses operating in Long Beach Interest rate: 2.44 percent
No fees Repayment period ranges from 5 to 7 years Borrowers may access a grace period of up to 9 months.
Loan proceeds may go toward business expenses, such as personnel, rent, supplies/materials, utilities, professional services, and more. Funding is subject to availability and submittal of a loan application does not guarantee funding. To get started, potential borrowers must sign-up for an appointment with the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at longbeachsbdc.org or by phone at (562) 938-5100.

Microenterprise Loan Program: The Microenterprise Loan Program is designed to support Long Beach small businesses. Between $25,000 to $100,000 is available for small businesses operating in Long Beach. Interest rate: Wall Street Journal prime rate + 1.5 percent. Fees: 2 percent loan fee, if loan closes. Term: 5 to 10 years Loan proceeds may go toward business expenses, such as personnel, rent, supplies/materials, utilities, professional services, and more (proceeds cannot be spent on construction). Must create 1 full-time job for every $35,000 borrowed. Businesses must be a for-profit entity. 

Grow Long Beach Fund: Partnership between the City of Long Beach and National Development Council Grow America Fund. Between $100,000 to $2 million is available for businesses that have been operating in Long Beach for at least two years. Interest rate: based on current Wall Street Journal prime rate. Term: 3 to 25 years. Loans underwritten by National Development Council and guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. Business must be a for-profit entity. Funds can be used for any legitimate business expense (construction, tenant improvements, equipment, working capital, etc.). 


City of Long Beach: COVID-19

Media Update for BUSINESSES    

December 6, 2020 

City of Long Beach Issues Updated Safer at Home Order  Modifications Put in Place in Alignment with State’s Regional Stay at Home Order

To further protect against the spread of COVID-19, in the midst of an unprecedented increase in cases which continues to impact hospital capacity, the Department of Health and Human Services will issue an updated Health Order tonight that prohibits or limits most non-essential activities, in alignment with the State’s Regional Stay at Home Order. The changes are effective at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6.

Following the alarming increase in COVID-19 transmission and its strain on Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospital capacity, on Dec. 3 Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the state would be divided into five regions for monitoring ICU bed capacity moving forward. When a region’s ICU capacity falls below 15%, the State’s Regional Stay at Home Order must be in place for at least three weeks. The Southern California region, which includes Long Beach, reached this threshold yesterday, when the regional ICU bed capacity dropped to 12.5%. The capacity has dropped even further, to 10.3%, as of today.

The order is focused on eliminating gatherings by people from separate households and encouraging people to stay home except as necessary to conduct activities associated with the operation, maintenance or usage of critical businesses, critical infrastructure and healthcare operations; as required by law; to conduct permitted activities; or as specifically permitted in the City Health Order. Gatherings of individuals from different households pose a significant risk of virus transmission to the community. The greater the number of people from different households in a gathering, the greater the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

Allowed Activities and Sectors

Outdoor recreation is allowed with modifications to limit the spread of COVID-19, including wearing a face covering at all times unless exempt, maintaining physical distancing of at least six feet from those outside one’s household and frequently washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Outdoor recreation includes:

  • Engaging in active outdoor recreation and personal exercise (including outdoor activities with pets) alone or with members of a single household, such as walking, cycling, hiking running
  • Tennis and pickleball
  • Gyms, for outdoor activity only
  • Beaches and parks for active recreation
  • Golf, as long as golf carts are only shared by members of the same household
  • Outdoor and indoor pools that serve members from more than one household are closed, except for outdoor pools that offer regulated lap swimming (one swimmer per lane). Drowning prevention classes, including swim lessons with certified instructors, are permitted indoors and outdoors.
  • Youth sports, for conditioning and skill building, alone or with members of one’s household. Individual lessons (one coach, one participant) are allowed so long as masking and physical distancing can be maintained through the entire lesson.

The following sectors may remain open, when a remote option is not possible, as long as appropriate safety measures, including wearing a face covering and practicing physical distancing, are adhered to at all times:

  • Critical infrastructure
  • Schools that previously received a waiver
  • Non-urgent medical and dental care
  • Child care

Prohibited Activities and Sectors

  • Indoor and outdoor dining (drive-thru, takeout and delivery are allowed)
  • Personal care services, which includes nail salons, tanning salons, esthetician, skin care and cosmetology services; electrology; body art professionals, tattoo parlors, microblading and permanent make-up and piercing shops; and massage therapy (in non-healthcare setting
  • Hair salons and barbershops
  • Museums, zoos and aquariums (indoor and outdoor)
  • Playgrounds (indoor and outdoor)
  • Bars, breweries, wineries and distilleries for in-person service. Production, distribution and retail for curbside, doorside or other outdoor pickup and delivery is permitted.
  • Family entertainment centers
  • Limited services, which includes businesses that provide grooming, walking or training services for animals/pets; car washes; and residential cleanings
  • In-person events that encourage gathering of people from multiple households, such as caroling, tree lighting, and holiday picture opportunities

Limitations on Capacity

  • Grocery stores are limited to 20% capacity. This includes certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, warehouse stores and other establishments engaged in the retail sale of canned food, dry goods, fresh fruit and vegetables, animal/pet supplies, water, fresh meats, fish and poultry, and any other business where the primary function of the business is to sell household consumer products (such as cleaning products or personal care products).
  • All other retail, whether indoors or outdoors, is limited to 20% capacity
  • Holiday markets remain permitted as retail, limited to 20% of maximum capacity

Travel

  • Residents should avoid non-essential travel that requires the resident to travel more than two hours from their residence or to other states or countries. Avoiding travel can reduce the risk of virus transmission and bringing the virus back into the city, county, region and state.
  • Hotels and lodgings, including short-term rentals, are open only for essential travel.

Gatherings with people outside of one’s household are prohibited, and drive-through events, including parades, are discouraged. The 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew put into effect on Nov. 21 is still in effect.

The City of Long Beach continues to closely monitor local data. In Long Beach, since Nov. 1, the number of new cases has increased by more than 320%. Yesterday, the City reported 525 new COVID-19 cases, the highest number reported in a single day since the pandemic began. Area hospitalizations for COVID-19 are now at 163 patients, an increase of 462% since Nov. 1. These data do not yet include the expected impacts from the Thanksgiving holiday.

The State announced that limited numbers of the COVID-19 vaccine will be available for Californians within the next two weeks, a promising hope as cases continue to rise at an alarming rate. Staying home remains the best way for people to protect themselves and others from the virus. Per the City’s health order, residents are required to wear face coverings, refrain from gathering with people outside of their household, practice physical distancing and wash hands frequently. Residents also are strongly encouraged to get flu shots to help maintain the health and safety of the community.

This action was put in place by the City Health Officer, Dr. Anissa Davis, and in accordance with the Emergency Powers granted to the City Manager through the Proclamation of Local Emergency. It is effective from 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6, until it is extended, rescinded or amended in writing by the Health Officer. Additional changes to the Regional Stay at Home Order could soon be announced by the State, after which the City will address any further potential changes.

The City recognizes that this is an extremely challenging time for residents and the community. The Governor’s office announced new assistance for people in need of financial support available online at covid19.ca.gov/get-financial-help/.

Additional resources and information for businesses are available at business.ca.gov/ and Long Beach-based businesses with questions regarding the new protocols or seeking support may call the City of Long Beach’s Business Information Line between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays at 562.570.4BIZ. Residents with questions may call the City’s Information Line at 562.570.INFO between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., weekdays.


Click here to see previous City of Long Beach COVID-19 Media Updates for BUSINESSES

Local, State, and Federal Updates and Guidance

Regional Stay Home Order:

The Regional Stay Home Order, announced December 3, 2020, will go into effect within 24 hours in regions with less than 15% ICU availability. It prohibits private gatherings of any size, closes sector operations except for critical infrastructure and retail, and requires 100% masking and physical distancing in all others.

The order will remain in effect for at least 3 weeks and, after that period, will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%. This will be assessed on a weekly basis after the initial 3 week period. Learn more about this order.

The state released a map of the five regions being measured. They are:

  • Northern California: Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity
  • Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma
  • Greater Sacramento: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba
  • San Joaquin Valley: Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, San Benito, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare, Tuolumne
  • Southern California: Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura
Map showing the 5 regions being measured by CDPH for ICU actual capacity: Northern California, Bay Area, Greater Sacramento, San Joaquin Valley, and Southern California.

City of Long Beach Safer at Home Order for Control of COVID-19 (Updated December 6, 2020)

When a region’s ICU capacity falls below 15%, the State’s Regional Stay at Home Order must be in place for at least three weeks. The Southern California region, which includes Long Beach, reached this threshold on December 5, when the regional ICU bed capacity dropped to 12.5%. The capacity has dropped even further, to 10.3%, as of December 6, 2020.

This Health Order is issued to align with the State Health Officer’s Regional Stay At Home Order issued on December 3, 2020.

GENERAL REQUIRMENTS FOR BUSINESSES

Allowed Businesses and Sectors. The sectors in this Section may operate where a remote option (telework) is not possible provided: that a Face Covering is worn; physical distancing of 6 feet or greater is maintained; all Physical Distancing Measures pursuant are adhered to; and operations are conducted in accordance with this Order and State and local guidance, which includes any City-issued
Industry-Specific Protocol required by the Long Beach Health Officer in this Order. Except where designated a Critical Business, Critical Infrastructure, Healthcare Operations, or required by law, establishments must close operations between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5.a.m.

  • Critical Businesses, Critical Infrastructure, and Healthcare Operations, including nonurgent medical services and dental care.
  • Retail establishments that provide goods to the public in accordance with the Retail In Person Shopping Protocols, as amended from time to time. Occupancy of indoor and outdoor retail establishments must be limited to 20% of maximum occupancy. Retail establishments include:
    • All stores and vendors located in indoor or outdoor shopping malls, strip malls, outlet malls, and swap meets (collectively “Shopping Center Operations”). Any
      business within a Shopping Center Operation required to remain closed pursuant to Section 16 must continue remain closed until each of those types of
      establishments are permitted by this Order to resume modified or full operations. Shopping Center Operations with food courts, dining areas, or restaurant
      operations may operate in accordance with the requirements in this Order for restaurants and Restaurant Protocols, as amended from time to time.
    • Libraries, for curbside, doorside, or other outdoor pickup only. Patrons must reserve or place items on-hold in advance via a reservation-based system, including a telephone option for individuals without internet access at home. Pickups may occur by appointment only.
    • Any manufacturing and logistics sector businesses which supplies retail establishments permitted to operate by this subsection.
    • Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, warehouse stores, and other establishments engaged in the retail sale of canned food, dry goods, fresh fruit and vegetables, animal/pet supply, water, fresh meats, fish, and poultry, and any other business where the primary function of the business is to sell household consumer products (such as cleaning products or personal care products). Retail food establishments in this subsection shall operate in accordance with the Grocery Facility Protocols, as amended from time to time, Such establishments are considered Critical Businesses.
  • Businesses whose operations require employees work from an office worksite who are not identified as an Essential Business, Healthcare Operation, or Critical Infrastructure in this Order for telework and for Minimum Basic Operations only. Essential Business, Healthcare Operation, or Critical Infrastructure whose operates necessitate that employees operate from an office worksite, must require employees telework to the extent feasible and any in-person operations must be in accordance with the Office Worksite Protocols, as amended from time to time. Office based Critical Businesses that operate indoors must limit capacity to 20% of maximum occupancy. Healthcare Operations and Critical Infrastructure are strongly encouraged, where possible, to limit the number of employees in the office to allow employees to easily maintain at least a six-foot distance from one another at all practicable times. Office worksites include the building, room or other area where an organization's
    employees perform administrative work in order to support and realize objects and goals of an organization. This subsection shall not apply to manufacturing or distribution operations
  • To promote and protect the physical and mental well-being of people in California, Outdoor Recreational Facilities may operate subject to the modifications in this subsection and any applicable City-issued Industry-Specific Protocol. Indoor recreational facilities must remain closed. Outdoor Recreational Facilities must close operations between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5.a.m. For purposes of this Order, “outdoor recreational facilities” include: public parks and beaches, including parking lots; public piers; beach bike and pedestrian paths that traverse the sanded portion of the beach; public trails; trailheads, dog parks; dog beaches; community gardens; campgrounds and RV parks; skate parks; basketball courts; volleyball courts; pickleball courts; picnic areas; outdoor swimming pools; outdoor gyms and fitness centers; outdoor equipment rentals; small charter services; tennis and pickleball courts; golf courses; and youth sports programs.
    • The following operations must close at Outdoor Recreational Facilities:
      • Playgrounds.
      • Restaurants and food concessions. Food, drink, or alcohol sales for onsite consumption at Outdoor Recreational Facilities is prohibited.
      • Visitors centers must remain closed to the public but may operate via telework and for Minimum Basic Operations.
      • Modifications for public parks and beaches. Active recreation is permitted at public parks and beaches, including public trails, trailheads, dog parks, dog beaches, community gardens, and any court or field located therein. Stationary activities, such as sitting, are strongly discouraged. Except as otherwise authorized by this Order, gatherings of members from different households are prohibited, including, but not limited to, any activity that requires a City facility rental or athletic field permit, events, athletic competitions, group sports, and picnics with members of different households.
      • Retail operations at Outdoor Recreational Facilities must adhere to the Retail In Person Shopping Protocols, as amended from time to
        time.
      • Small charter services, which includes fishing, chartered boat, or small group  guided trips, are permitted in accordance with the Small Charter Services Protocols, as amended from time to time.
      • Outdoor equipment rental services are permitted in accordance with the Outdoor Equipment Rental Services Protocol, as amended from time to time.
      • Tennis centers and pickleball courts are permitted in accordance with the Tennis Protocols, as amended from time to time.
      • Public and private golf courses are permitted including any associated parking lots, in accordance with the Golf Course Protocols, as amended from time to time.
      • Outdoor and indoor pools that serve members from more than one household are closed, except that outdoor pools that offer regulated lap swimming (one swimmer per lane) may remain open and drowning prevention classes, including swim lessons with certified instructors, are permitted indoors and outdoors in accordance with the Protocols for Public Swimming Pools, as amended from
        time to time.
      • Gyms and fitness facilities are permitted for outdoor operations only, in accordance with the Gym and Fitness Center Protocols, as amended from time to time.
      • Campgrounds and RV Parks are permitted provided guests do not stay overnight for recreational purposes and the establishment operates in accordance with the Campground and RV Park Protocols, as amended from time to time.
      • Campgrounds and RV parks are permitted to provide accommodation for COVID-19 mitigation and containment measures, treatment measures, accommodation for critical workers, or for providing housing solutions, including measures to protect homeless populations are considered a Critical Business.
      • Youth sports programs are permitted outdoors only for conditioning and skill building alone or with members of a single household, in accordance with Protocols for Youth Sports Leagues, as amended from time to time. Individual lessons (one coach, one participant) are allowed so long as masking and physical distancing can be maintained through the entire lesson.
  • Restaurants, which include, brewpubs, breweries, bars, pubs, craft distilleries, and wineries that hold a City-issued restaurant permit to provide sit-down, dine-in bona fide meals, may operate for drive-thru, curbside, doorside, or other outdoor pickup and delivery only and in accordance with the Restaurant Protocols, as amended from time to time.
    • Brewpubs, breweries, bars, pubs, craft distilleries, and wineries may sell beer, wine, and pre-mixed drinks or cocktails not in manufacturers containers for consumption off the licensed premises where the establishment sells alcohol with a bona fide meal provided by a City-approved meal provider in accordance with the Restaurant Protocols, as amended from time to time.
    • Brewpubs, breweries, craft distilleries, and wineries that do not hold a City-issued restaurant permit may continue retail, distribution, and manufacturing operations only. Retail operations of brewpubs, breweries, craft distilleries, and wineries that do not hold City-issued restaurant permit may operate for curbside, doorside, or other outdoor
      pickup and delivery only in accordance with Restaurant Protocols, as amended from time to time, and regulations implemented by the California Alcohol and Beverage Control.
    • Any service of food, beverages (including alcohol) that involves a customer remaining in-person to consume food or beverages onsite is prohibited.
  • Limited services deemed a Critical Business or Critical Infrastructure pursuant to this Order, which include:
    • Laundromats, laundry services, and dry cleaners.
    • Gas stations, auto-supply, mobile auto-repair operations, automobile sales, auto repair shops, bicycle repair shops, towing and recovery services, and related distribution, sales, rental, leasing, repair, and maintenance facilities.
    • Plumbers, electricians, professional pest control, custodial/janitorial workers, handyman services, funeral home workers and morticians, moving services, HVAC installers, carpenters, vegetation service, tree maintenance, landscapers, gardeners, property managers, private security personnel and other service providers who provide services to maintain the security, safety, sanitation, and
      critical operation to properties and other Critical Businesses.
  • Drive-in operations, including movie theaters and restaurants, may operate provided any City-issued permit required for the activity is obtained and in compliance with State issued guidance found here. As all residents must stay home except for limited exceptions, drive-in operations are strongly discouraged. Drive-in operations are subject to the following restrictions:
    • (1) vehicles must be spaced at least 6 feet apart;
    • (2) gatherings outside vehicles are prohibited;
    • (3) all people must remain in their vehicle if not utilizing restroom facilities or picking up concessions or food;
    • (4) each vehicle may only be occupied by members of the same household; (5) drive-in operations for restaurants are limited to parking assigned to the restaurant and may not utilize the
      public right-of-way; and (6) restaurants are prohibited from serving alcoholic beverages to customers dining in their vehicles at a drive-in operation.
  • Day camps, in accordance with the Day Camp Protocols, as amended from time to time.
  • Training and competition of professional sports without live audiences, in accordance with Protocol for Professional Sports Leagues and Facilities - Spectator-Free Events, as amended from time to time. Back office staff and management may operate via telework and for Minimum Basic Operations only. Retail operations must adhere to the Retail In-Person Shopping Protocols as amended from time to time.
  • Shared electric scooters (e-scooters) and bicycle sharing services that require a City Micro-Mobility Permit, in accordance with sanitation and operating protocols required in their City-issued Micro-Mobility Permit.
  • Public and private K-12 schools. The State Public Health Officer requires all public and private schools (K-12) in the Southern California Region, including the County of Long
    Angeles and the City of Long Beach, to remain closed to in-person learning except as permitted by this subsection. Public and private K-12 schools may continue to conduct distance learning. Public and private K-12 schools approved to operate under an elementary school waiver approved by the Long Beach Health Officer as of the effective date of this Order may provide in-person instruction to students. All public and private K-12 schools may continue to provide small-group, in-person services in controlled, supervised and indoor environments for specialized services, targeted services and support for students with disabilities, English learners, at-risk students, and high-need students for no more than 25% of maximum occupancy. Schools (K-12) that are
    permitted to remain open for in-person learning must follow the Reopening Protocols for K-12 Schools and the Protocol for COVID-19 Exposure Management Plan in K-12 Schools;
  • Institutes of Higher Education. Colleges and universities in Long Beach will not be able to resume all in-person academic instruction, at this time. Institutions may continue to
    offer in-person training and instruction for critical workforce for only those activities that cannot be accomplished through virtual learning. All other academic instruction must
    continue to be done via distance-learning as specified in the Protocols for Institutes of Higher Education and the Protocol for COVID-19 Exposure Management Plan for Institutes of Higher Education, as amended from time to time,
  • In-Person Religious Services and Cultural Ceremonies Outdoors. Pursuant to guidance issued by the State Health Officer titled “COVID-19 Industry Guidance: Places of Worship and Providers of Religious Services and Cultural Ceremonies” found here, inperson religious services and cultural ceremonies are permitted outdoors only. Indoor in-person religious services and cultural ceremonies are prohibited. There is no maximum for the total number of individuals permitted to gather outdoors for a service or ceremony provided that physical distancing of 6 feet between persons or groups of persons from different households is maintained at all times and attendees adhere strictly to all other Physical Distancing Measures pursuant to Section 21. Back office
    staff and management may operate via telework and for Minimum Basic Operations only. Service of food and/or beverages is prohibited. Singing, chanting, and other practices and performances are prohibited for in-person services. This subsection does not allow for any gathering or the operation of any business or activity prohibited by this Order. Alternative methods of providing services (such as via the internet, streaming, or telephone) in place of or in addition to in-person services are strongly encouraged, wherever possible.
  • Compliance with State and Local Orders. All businesses and organizations permitted to operate under this Order shall comply with local and State orders, guidance, protocols, and laws, including but not limited to, the November 21, 2020 Limited Stay-At-Home order and the December 3, 2020 Regional Stay-At-Home Order issued by the State Health Officer. To  the extent that provisions in the directives of the Health Officer and the guidance of the State Health Officer conflict, the more restrictive provisions (i.e., the more protective of public health) apply. In the event of a conflict between provisions of any previously-issued Health Officer directive and this Order (including the revised provisions of the Appendixes), this Order controls over the conflicting provisions of the Health Officer directive.
    • State Orders and guidance are located at the following sites:
      • Industry Guidance - https://covid19.ca.gov/industry-guidance/
      • Blueprint for a Safer Economy - https://covid19.ca.gov/safer-economy/
      • Executive Orders and Health Orders - https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-homeexcept-for-essential-needs/#top
      • Essential Workforce Sector Guidance - https://covid19.ca.gov/essentialworkforce/
      • State Health Officer Guidance - https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/Guidance.aspx
    • City Health Orders, guidance, Physical Distancing Protocols (Appendix A) and any City-issued Industry-Specific Protocols are located here:
      http://www.longbeach.gov/health/diseases-and-condition/informationon/coronavirus/covid-19-orders/
  • Maximization of Telework. All businesses permitted to operate under this Order must continue to maximize the number of personnel who work remotely from their place of residence.
  • Activities that Can Occur Outdoors. All businesses permitted to operate under this Order are strongly urged to move as many operations as possible outdoors, to the extent permitted by local law and permitting requirements, where there is generally less risk of COVID-19 transmission. Businesses that operate outdoors may, subject to any applicable permit requirements, conduct their operations in a tent, canopy, or other shelter, as long as the shelter complies with: (1) the California Department of Public Health’s November 25, 2020 guidance regarding “Use of Temporary Structures for Outdoor Business Operations” and (2) any additional requirements or guidance issued by the Health Officer or the City.
  • Limited Hours of Operation. Except where designated a Critical Business, Critical Infrastructure, or a Healthcare Operation, or where required by law, establishments must close operations between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5.a.m.
  • Physical Distancing Protocols Required. The owner or operator of any business permitted to operate pursuant to this Order shall perform a detailed risk assessment and prepare, implement, and post a Physical Distancing Protocols (attached as Appendix A), or any City issued Industry-Specific Protocol required by this Order, as they may be amended from time to time, at each of their facilities in the City frequented by the public or employees subject to the requirements herein prior to operation.
  • All businesses operating under this Order shall provide evidence of its implementation to any authority enforcing this Order upon demand. The Physical Distancing Protocols or City-issued
    Industry-Specific Protocol must be posted at or near the entrance of the relevant facility and shall be easily viewable by the public and employees. A copy of the Physical Distancing Protocols or City-issued Industry-Specific Protocol must also be provided to each employee performing work at the facility.
  • The Physical Distancing Protocols or City-issued Industry-Specific Protocol of any business operating pursuant to this Order must explain how the business is achieving the following, as applicable:
    • Except as otherwise indicated in this Order, including a City-issued Industry-Specific Protocol, limiting the number of people who can enter into the facility at any one time to ensure that people in the facility can easily maintain a minimum six-foot distance from one another at all times, except as required to complete a business activity. Businesses are required to comply with any limit on capacity identified in this Order or a City-issued Industry-Specific Protocol. This requirement includes providing adequate security of staffing to implement any necessary crowd control or limit on capacity. Persons who are members of the same household, may stand or move together, but must be separated from others by a distance of at least 6 feet.
    • Where lines may form at a facility, marking six-foot increments at a minimum, establishing where individuals should stand to maintain adequate physical distancing, whether outside or inside the facility. Businesses electing to, or required to, operate for curbside, doorside, or other outdoor pickup or delivery must also explain how the
      business is preventing the public right-of-way and/or ADA accessibility on sidewalks, surrounding areas, and other businesses during pickups. This includes, but is not limited to, creating a system for people to stand in socially distanced line, indicators on the ground where people should stand, and any other crowd control measures (e.g. staff to assigned to crowd control).
    • Providing, at the business’ expense, hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, soap and water, or disinfectant qualified for use against COVID-19 at or near the entrance of the facility, in other appropriate areas for use by the public and employees, and in locations where there is high-frequency employee interaction with members of the public (e.g. cashiers). Restrooms normally open to the public shall remain open to the public.
    • Providing for the regular disinfection of high-touch surfaces and disinfection of all payment portals, pens, and styluses after each use, including sufficient staffing to
      ensure an employee is assigned to regularly disinfect such surfaces. Businesses are encouraged to also offer touch-less payment mechanisms, if feasible.
    • Providing physical space between employees and customers (e.g. plexiglass at point of sale locations, drive through, partitions).
    • Posting a sign at the entrance of the facility informing all employees and customers that, they should: (1) avoid entering the facility if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including cough or fever; (2) to maintain a minimum six-foot distance from one another; (3) sneeze and cough into one’s elbow; (4) not shake hands or engage in any unnecessary physical contact.
    • Require, and permit adequate time for, employees to wash their hands at least every 30 minutes, or as needed if gloves are provided. Where hand washing is impracticable to the nature of the employee’s work, the employer shall provide hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol to the employee. Such employees shall also be required and permitted adequate time to sanitize their hands at least every 30 minutes, or as needed if gloves are provided.
    • Ensure sanitary bathrooms are made available to employees, which are stocked with necessary soap, towels, toilet seat covers, and toilet paper.
    • Providing, at the employer’s expense, Face Coverings for employees and contracted workers whose duties require interactions with other employees and/or the public, as
      well as appropriate training on their proper use.
    • Require that members of the public who enter the facility, or obtain products or service via curbside, doorside, or other outdoor pickup or delivery, wear a Face Covering during their time in the facility or during their interaction with employees. Businesses may refuse admission or service to any individual who fails to wear a Face Covering required by this subsection.
    • Make every effort to implement to Physical Distancing Protocols or City-issued Industry Specific Protocols, as required, with employees, including, but not limited to: (i) allow employees to telework; (ii) allow for flexible schedules, such as, staggering schedules of employees so less individuals occupy a worksite at any given time; (iii) separate, employees by at least 6 feet; (iv) allow teleconferencing or video conferencing for meetings; (v) discontinue in-person meetings or gatherings of any sort, especially in locations where employees could interact or come in contact with any member of the
      public, including limiting the need for employees to work in-person in teams of two or
      more.
    • Minimum Basic Operations. All businesses not permitted by this Order to resume modified or full operations are required to cease all in-person activities, except for Minimum Basic
      Operations. “Minimum Basic Operations” means all persons and businesses required to cease in-person operations may continue to work from home and may travel to those
      businesses for the following reasons:
      • The minimum necessary activities to maintain and protect the value of the business's inventory and facilities; ensure security, safety, and sanitation; process payroll and
        employee benefits;
      • The minimum necessary activities to facilitate owners, employees, and contractors of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their Residences, and to
        ensure that the business can deliver its service remotely.
  • IMMEDIATE AND CONTINUED CLOSURES OF CERTAIN SECTORS
    • Immediate and Continued Closures of Certain Sectors. The Health Officer orders the immediate and continued closure of the following sectors and activities:
      • Convention centers and public entertainment venues, such as, amusement parks, movie theaters (except drive-in), live performance theaters, concert halls, arenas, stadiums, theme parks, festivals, and sports with live audiences.
      • Live entertainment, including, but not limited to, live music and live performances
      • Indoor and outdoor operations of nightclubs and lounges, including, but not limited to, smoking, cigar, or hookah lounges.
      • Indoor and outdoor operations of family entertainment centers, such as bowling alleys and arcades, batting cages, miniature golf, go cart racing, and such facilities located in public parks
      • Indoor and outdoor operations of hair salons and barbershops.
      • Indoor operations of gyms and fitness facilities.
      • Indoor and outdoor operations of personal services, including, nail salons, tanning salons, esthetician, skin care and cosmetology services; electrology; body art professionals, tattoo parlors, microblading and permanent make-up; and piercing shops; and massage therapy (in non-healthcare setting).
      • Indoor and outdoor in-person dining or service that involves a customer remaining onsite to consume food, beverages, or alcohol at restaurants and similar food facilities, brewpubs, craft distilleries, breweries, bars, pubs and wineries including any associated tasting rooms, including those restaurants and food concessions location at Outdoor Recreational Facilities.
      • Indoor and outdoor operations of museums, zoos, and aquariums. Zoos and aquariums must close to the public but may continue to operate to the extent necessary to care for animals.
      • Limited services, which includes: businesses that provide grooming, walking, and training services for animals/pets; car washes; and residential cleanings.
      • Indoor and outdoor playgrounds.
      • Indoor recreational facilities.
      • Recreational adult team sports.
      • All public or private indoor pools and all indoor and outdoor public or private spas, hot  tubs, saunas, and steam rooms except those located in a single-family residence, which shall be used only by members of the household residing at the single-family residence.
      • Drowning prevention classes, including swim lessons with certified instructors, are permitted in indoor and outdoor swimming pools, as they are deemed Critical Businesses.
      •  All activities, events and gatherings, unless specifically allowed by this Order.
  • DEFINITIONS
    For Purposes of this Order, the following definitions shall apply:
    • Critical Businesses. “Critical Businesses” shall refer to those establishments whose primary business, per their City-issued business license is any of the following
      • Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores, warehouse stores, and other establishments engaged in the retail sale of canned food, dry goods, fresh fruit and vegetables, animal/pet supply, water, fresh meats, fish, and poultry, and any other business where the primary function of the
        business is to sell household consumer products (such as cleaning products or personal care products). This includes stores that sell groceries and sell other non-grocery products, and products necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation, and critical operation of residences. Retail food establishments in this subsection shall operate in accordance with the Grocery Facility Protocols, as amended from time to time. Where applicable, retail operations of establishment in this subsection must adhere to the Retail In-Person Shopping Protocols attached as amended from time to time;
      • Food processors, confectioners, food packagers, food testing labs that are not open to the public, and food cultivation, including farming, livestock, and fishing;
      • Organizations and businesses that provide food, shelter, and social services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals (including gang prevention and intervention, domestic violence, and homeless service agencies);
      • Newspapers, television, radio, magazine, podcast and other journalism activities, including taped, digitally recorded or online-streamed content of any sort that is produced by one or more members of a single household, within the household’s residence and without the physical presence of any non-member of the household. Music, film, and television production may resume in accordance with the Music, Film, and Television Protocols, as amended from time to time. Back office staff and management may operate via telework and for Minimum Basic Operations only;
      • Gas stations, auto-supply, mobile auto-repair operations, automobile sales, auto repair shops, bicycle repair shops, towing and recovery services, and related distribution, sales,
        rental, leasing, repair, and maintenance facilities;
      • Banks, credit unions, financial institutions, and insurance companies;
      • Hardware stores, garden nurseries, building supply stores;
      • Plumbers, electricians, professional pest control, custodial/janitorial workers, handyman services, funeral home workers and morticians, moving services, HVAC installers, carpenters, vegetation service, tree maintenance, landscapers, gardeners, property managers, private security personnel and other service providers who provide services to maintain the security, safety, sanitation, and critical operation to properties and other Critical Businesses;
      • Businesses providing mailing and shipping services, including post office boxes;
      • Educational institutions (including public and private K-12 schools, colleges, and
        universities);
      • Laundromats, dry cleaners, and laundry service providers;
      • Restaurants and other food facilities, including, brewpubs, breweries, bars, pubs, craft distilleries, and wineries that hold a City-issued restaurant permit, that prepare and serve food for drive-thru, curbside, doorside, or other outdoor pickup and delivery only in accordance with the Restaurant Protocols. Mobile food vendors, such as food trucks and food carts, shall operate in accordance with the Mobile Food Vendor Protocols, as amended from time to time. Any service of food, beverages, and/or alcohol indoors that involves a customer sitting indoors or remaining indoors to consume food or beverages is prohibited.
      • Businesses that supply office or computer products needed by people who work from home;
      • Non-manufacturing, transportation, or distribution businesses that ship, truck, transport, or provide logistical support to deliver groceries, food, goods or services directly to residences, Critical Businesses, Healthcare Operations, Critical Infrastructure, or Lower Risk Businesses;
      • Airlines, taxis, ride sharing services, and other private transportation providers providing transportation services necessary for activities of daily living and other purposes expressly authorized in this Order;
      • Businesses that provide manufacture and/or provide necessary service for Critical Infrastructure and Healthcare Operations;
      • Businesses that supply other Critical Businesses with the support or supplies necessary to operate;
      • Home-based care for seniors, adults, people with a disability, or children;
      • Residential facilities and shelters for people experiencing homelessness, seniors, adults, people with a disability, and children;
      • Professional services, such as legal, payroll, or accounting services, when necessary to assist in compliance with legally mandated activities, and the permitting, inspection, construction,  transfer and recording of ownership of housing, including residential and commercial real estate and anything incidental thereto, provided that appointments and other residential viewings must only occur virtually or, if a virtual viewing is not feasible, by appointment with no more than two visitors at a time residing within the same household and one individual showing the unit (except that in-person visits are not allowed when the occupant is still residing in the residence) and in accordance with Physical Distancing Protocols
      • Childcare facilities. To the extent possible, childcare facilities must operate under the  following mandatory conditions:
      • Any other conditions required by the California Department of Social Services found here.
      • Hotels, motels, lodging, shared rental units, and other similar facilities may only offer accommodation for COVID-19 mitigation and containment measures, treatment measures, accommodation for critical workers, or for providing housing solutions, including measures to protect homeless populations, in accordance with the Hotels, Lodging, and Short-Term Rental Protocols, as amended from time to time, attached as Appendix Q. Establishments in this subsection are prohibited from offering accommodations for tourism and pleasure travel. Short-term rentals (“STRs”),or shared rental units, are permitted subject to this Order, and also pursuant to any Ordinance or regulation adopted by the City that governs the operation of short-term or other shared rental units. Shared rental units, such as, but not limited to, STRs or time-shares may only be rented provided that the owner/host of the unit, or anyone affiliated with the owner/host does not also occupy or live in the unit at any time during the duration of the stay/rental period; unless the owner/host has a separate exterior point of entrance and exit and no facilities such as a kitchen area, bathroom, or other living space is shared with the guest/tenant during the stay/rental period.
      • Construction, which includes the operation, inspection, and maintenance of construction sites and construction projects for construction of commercial, office and institutional
        buildings, residential, mixed-use, and housing construction.
      • Manufacturers and retailers of fabric or cloth that is made into personal protective equipment, such as, Face Coverings.
      • Drowning prevention classes, including swim lessons with certified instructors, whether in indoor or outdoor swimming pools.
  • Face Covering. “Face Covering” or “Face Coverings” means a covering made of cloth, fabric, or other soft or permeable material, without holes, that fully covers only the nose and mouth
    and surrounding areas of the lower face. A covering that hides or obscures the wearer’s eyes or forehead is not a Face Covering. Examples of Face Coverings include a scarf or bandana;
    a neck gaiter; a homemade covering made from a t-shirt, sweatshirt, or towel, held on with rubber bands or otherwise; or a mask, which need not be medical-grade. A Face Covering may be factory-made or may be handmade and improvised from ordinary household materials. The Face Covering should be comfortable, so that the wearer can breathe through the nose and does not have to adjust it frequently, so as to avoid touching the face.  For as long as medical-grade masks such as N95 masks and surgical masks are in short supply, members of the public should not purchase those masks for use as Face Coverings under this Order. Such medical-grade masks should be reserved for healthcare workers and first responders. Any mask that incorporates a one-way valve (typically a raised plastic cylinder about the size of a quarter on the front or side of the mask) that is designed to facilitate easy exhaling allows droplets to be released from the mask, putting others nearby at risk. As a result, these masks are not a Face Covering under this Order and must not be used to comply with this Order’s requirements. Face Coverings should not be used as a substitute for other evidence-based measures  to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Face Coverings should be used in addition to, but not in place of, other evidence-based measures (e.g. physical distancing; frequent hand washing practices; avoiding touching our eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; avoiding being around sick people). Physical distancing of 6 feet or great should be maintained between non-household members even when donning a Face Covering.
  • Critical Infrastructure. “Critical Infrastructure” includes, but shall not be limited to: public health, public works construction; airport operations; port operations; water; sewer; gas;
    electrical; oil refining and extraction; road and highways; government operations; public transportation; solid waste collection and removal; emergency services; flood control and watershed protection; internet and telecommunications systems (including the provision of critical global, national, local infrastructure for computing services, business infrastructure, communications, and web-based services); and manufacturing and distribution companies deemed critical as part of the Critical Infrastructure supply chain, provided that they carry out those services or that work in compliance with Physical Distancing Measures, to the extent practical.
  • Healthcare Operations. ”Healthcare Operations” includes, but not shall not be limited to: hospitals, clinics, laboratories, dentists, optometrists, pharmacies, physical therapists, and
    chiropractors; pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies; other licensed healthcare facilities, healthcare suppliers, home healthcare service providers, mental or behavioral health providers; alcohol and drug treatment providers; medical cannabis dispensaries with all required state and local licenses; medical or scientific research companies or any related and/or ancillary healthcare services; manufacturers, distributors and servicers of medical devices, diagnostics, and equipment (including personal protective equipment); veterinary care; and all healthcare provided to animals. This Order does not apply to businesses that provide support, supplies, or services deemed critical as part of the supply chain to Healthcare Operations. This exemption shall be broadly construed to avoid any impact to the delivery of healthcare, broadly defined. Healthcare Operations does not include fitness and exercise gyms and similar exercise or training facilities. In working for, volunteering at, or obtaining services from Healthcare Operations, individuals must comply with the specific Physical Distancing Measures and infection control guidance for that clinical or non-clinical setting.
  • Physical Distance Measures. “Physical Distancing Measures” means (1) maintaining at least six-foot physical distance from other individuals, even when wearing a Face Covering; (2) engaging in activities outdoors instead of indoors, whenever possible; (3) washing hands with soap and water for at least twenty seconds or use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, as frequently as possible; (4) covering coughs or sneezes (into the sleeve, elbow, or tissue, not hands); (5) regularly cleaning and disinfecting high-touch surfaces; (6) avoid
    physically intimate forms of greeting such as shaking hands, hugging, and kissing; (7) avoid all physical interaction with other people when sick; (8) to the extent feasible, avoid eating and drinking in public places; and (9) wearing a Face Covering in accordance with Section 6(h).

Physical Distancing Protocol (Reopening Checklist) (Spanish) (Tagalog)


City of Long Beach Posters for Businesses

  • The City of Long Beach has created a variety of posters that business owners can print and post at their businesses for their customers and employees. Click here to download posters.


Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) First Notice of Regulatory Relief

Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) Second Notice of Regulatory Relief

ABC announces 30 day extension on Annual License Renewal Fees & Late Renewal Penalty Fees

ABC Industry Advisory - Delivery of Alcoholic Beverages

  • Many licensees deliver alcoholic beverages to consumers at residences, businesses, and other locations away from the licensed premises. 
  • Although delivery is a privilege most retailers have had for many years with respect to beer and wine, since the advent of the COVID-19 crisis, and the Department permitting the delivery of distilled spirits and retailer-packaged alcoholic beverages, there has been a marked increase in deliveries.
  • This Industry Advisory is to call licensees’ attention to four issues:
    • (1) to remind licensees of their legal obligations relating to deliveries;
    • (2) to ensure licensees are aware that they are ultimately responsible for the delivery of the alcoholic beverage;
    • (3) that the Department’s recent enforcement actions have revealed that third-party delivery services are routinely delivering alcoholic beverages to minors; and
    • (4) that many licensees, and the delivery services they use, are failing to adhere to a variety of other legal obligations.
    • Read More

City of Long Beach COVID-19 Data Dashboard 

  • City of Long Beach's website now features an interactive data dashboard that provides the public with information regarding positive cases, hospitalizations, demographic breakdowns and more. The dashboard allows the public to see more granular data than previously released and now provides city comparisons among other jurisdictions. The elements of the dashboard are updated as information comes in so that the public can get the most up-to-date information available.

City of Long Beach Coronavirus Disease - Most Recent Updates


Los Angeles County Business & Worker Disaster Help Center


CDC Guidance for Business and Employers

  • CDC Family First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) - FFCRA requires certain employers to provide their employees with paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave for specified reasons related to COVID-19. Part of the FFCRA mandates employers to post the notice regarding Employee Rights Under the FFCRA – Sick Leave and Expanded FMLA. These provisions will apply from April 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020
City of Long Beach COVID-19 Daily Updates

City of Long Beach: COVID-19

Daily Update

Monday, Nov. 30, 2020

2 p.m.

 

By the Numbers (Long Beach only): 

  • 16,202 total positive results
    • 680 new cases since last update (Nov. 24)*  
    • Seven-day positivity rate: 5.3%
    • 24.7 daily new cases per 100K population
  • 275 fatalities
  • 64 people hospitalized 
  • Approximately 14,378 recovered (Please note that, for low-risk patients recovering at home, recovery data is self-reported) 
  • 340,497 total tests conducted 
  • Information as of November 28

 

*Please note that, due to a data processing delay, the City expects a backlog of cases from last week to be reported tomorrow.

 

State Indicators (Updated on 11/28/20):

  • Current LA County Tier: Purple Tier (Widespread)
  • Seven-day positivity rate: 6.8%
  • 19.4 daily new cases per 100K population
  • Testing positivity in lowest-resourced areas (health equity metric): N/A

 

Details Regarding Fatalities:

  • 159 are associated with long-term care facilities (LTCF)
  • Ages:
    • 2 were in their 20s
    • 1 were in their 30s
    • 8 were in their 40s
    • 24 were in their 50s
    • 64 were in their 60s
    • 65 were in their 70s
    • 75 were in their 80s
    • 36 were over 90 
  • 117 female, 158 male
  • 3 individuals had no known underlying health conditions

 

Daily Highlights

  • Six public-facing Police Department employees have tested positive for COVID-19, including:
    • An employee assigned to Airport Security Detail, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 19 and are now recovering at home.
    • An employee assigned to Park Ranger Station, who is a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 22 and are now recovering at home.
    • An employee assigned to South Division, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 19 and are now recovering at home.
    • An employee assigned to South Division, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 24 and are now recovering at home.
    • An employee assigned to South Division, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 24 and are now recovering at home.
    • An employee assigned to South Division, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 25 and are now recovering at home. 
  • Two public-facing Fire Department employees have tested positive for COVID-19, including:
    • An employee assigned to Fire Station 1, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 19 and are now recovering at home. 
    • An employee assigned to Fire Station 16, who is not a Long Beach resident. They were last at work on Nov. 21 and are now recovering at home. 
  • Long Beach is seeking proposals to develop collaborative partnerships among Black-serving provider agencies to promote health and wellness among Black residents who are disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. 
  • Recognizing the financial strain that the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have on many local businesses, the Long Beach City Council last week voted unanimously to offer additional time for business owners to pay some City business license tax and fees and provide an additional grant opportunity to eligible businesses that have been particularly hard-hit by the pandemic.
  • The City is seeking to contract with community-based nonprofits to receive reimbursement for providing various resources and services to address the impacts of COVID-19 from March to Nov. 2020.
  • Contracts have been awarded to several local nonprofit organizations to provide supportive services to the City’s older adult community during the pandemic.

 

Long-Term Care Facility Case Information:

  • A total of 1,544 positive cases have been confirmed at LTCFs in the city since the start of the pandemic (see attachment).

 

Tracking the Curve: 


Click Here for City Press Release Archives

Resources & Updates for Restaurants and Bars

Click Here for Long Beach Restaurants and Eateries Open for Take-Out and/or Delivery

See an Interactive Map - HERE


The City of Long Beach officially launched the new Outdoor Dining Grant Program

The City of Long Beach Outdoor Dining Grant Program will provide financial relief to Long Beach bars, breweries, distilleries, restaurants and wineries.

It will administer grants up to $10,000 to reimburse a variety of existing eligible expenses associated with operating outdoors. Eligible expenses must have been incurred between June 1, 2020 and Dec. 28, 2020.

Outdoor Dining Grant Prequalification Form

The Outdoor Dining Grant Prequalification Form opened today, Friday, Dec. 18, and will close on Monday, Dec. 28 at 4 p.m.

Grants will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.


City of Long Beach Business License Relief

The City has extended the waiver of penalties related to the payment of any license taxes as well as health, fire and business licensing fees issued from March 16, 2020, to March 31, 2021. Any bills issued during this period should still be paid in a timely manner if at all possible, but no penalty will accrue until after March 31, 2021. Additionally, the City will offer a Business License Fee Grant to offset the cash flow drain of business license fees for qualified full-service independent restaurants that have been closed or materially restricted in operation and demonstrate major financial hardship as a result of the City’s Health Order. For more information, business owners can email lbbiz@longbeach.gov or call 562-570-6211.


Rapid Recovery Webinars For Business 

  • Access expert videos to increase e-commerce, access capital, improve operational efficiency and adapt strategy
  • Tap into LAEDC’s Rapid Response Business Assistance program, a free consulting service to help businesses overcome challenges

Restaurants in Long Beach may choose to access the following resources made available through the Economic Development Department:

  • Small Business Transition And Technology Grant (SBTT) Program will provide grants to support small businesses operating in Long Beach with an emphasis on those located in the geographically disadvantaged areas of the City most impacted by COVID-19. Approximately $3,300,000 is available for the SBTT Grants. The SBTT Program will provide Working Capital Grants up to $5,000 and Technology Grants up to $2,000.
  • Emergency Microloan Program is designed to support Long Beach businesses and nonprofits with five or less employees that have been financially burdened by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Between $2,500 to $10,000 is available for small businesses operating in Long Beach. Loan proceeds may go toward business expenses, such as personnel, rent, supplies/materials, utilities, professional services and more.
  • Kiva Long Beach Loan Program is an online community-lending program that is designed to support Long Beach small businesses. Between $500 to $15,000 is available for small businesses operating in Long Beach. Loan proceeds may go toward business expenses, such as personnel, rent, supplies/materials, utilities, professional services and more.

ShopSafeShopLocal: The State of California has partnered with industry-leading companies to launch a website, ShopSafeShopLocal, that connects small business owners to tools and resources related to shipping, operations, online marketing, and more.

Health Resources

VACCINES FOR CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19)

The Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services (Health Department) has announced that it will receive up to 3,900 doses of the Pfizer vaccine and vaccinations should begin by the end of the year.  In addition to the 3,900 doses of the Pfizer vaccine, the City expects to receive up to 11,600 doses of the Moderna vaccine in the weeks ahead. Critical populations, like hospital workers, will have access to the vaccine initially.

The Health Department is managing the vaccine distribution process and will be following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the State. The City has the infrastructure to receive, store, distribute and dispense the vaccine.

Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require two doses and provide the same efficacy. The difference between the two vaccines is the storage requirements.

Vaccine distribution and dispensing is a normal function of the Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services. Its Public Health Emergency Management team and immunization coordinator have been training and exercising to prepare for mass vaccinations for years. Every year, including this one, the Health Department practices for emergency vaccine distribution by conducting mass vaccination events in the City during the flu season when it provides free drive-thru flu vaccines.

Long Beach residents should expect that they will be able to receive the vaccine at no charge because it will be paid for by the federal government or through one’s insurance company.

Vaccine Administration Overview

There will be several phases to the overall vaccination plan. Phases are determined by the CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The ACIP has given guidance on prioritizing those who are at highest risk of infection, like our hospital workers and other frontline workers, and later expanding to other essential workers, adults over the age of 65 and those with underlying health conditions. This prioritization, established to benefit the entire community, is organized into a set of phases, sub phases and tiers.

Phase 1a will be the first group to have access to the vaccine. The number of people in this group is larger than the quantity of doses in the first shipment, therefore Phase 1a is divided into three tiers. The City expects everyone in Phase 1a to be vaccinated within the first three months of next year.

Tier 1 of Phase 1a includes acute care and skilled nursing facilities, paramedics and EMTs and dialysis centers.
Tier 2 includes intermediate and home health care, community/public health field staff and primary care clinics.
Most other healthcare settings including laboratories, dentist offices and pharmacies will be in Tier 3.

In Phase 1b, as more vaccine allotments are received, they will be offered to other essential workers which includes refuse workers, grocery workers and those who have been working during the pandemic in an essential job function. The City anticipates this phase will begin in March or April of 2021. Phase 1c includes high-risk populations of adults over age 65 and adults with high-risk medical conditions.

During Phase 2, the vaccine will be available to the general public. Administration of the vaccine to the general public is expected in early summer.

Over the next few months, the Health Department will be distributing vaccines to City partners to ensure those in Phase 1 can receive the vaccination. Then City-led dispensing operations will begin. The Health Department will hold dispensing clinics, known as PODs (Point of Dispensing) initially for essential workers and later for the general public.


FREE TESTING. NO INSURANCE REQUIRED

Diagnostic testing in Long Beach is available for anyone with symptoms of COVID-19. Certain locations are also testing Long Beach residents and essential workers who may have been exposed but are not showing symptoms. See below for more information. Same or next day appointments can be made online and are prioritized for those 65 years or older; individuals with underlying chronic health conditions; and first responders, critical government workers, grocery workers, and health care professionals. If employees do not have symptoms and have not had any recent close contact with someone who has COVID-19, they do not need to get tested before returning to work. Click here for COVID-19 Testing Centers 


Dignity Health Offers Free COVID-19 Virtual Care

Dignity Health is focused on helping our providers and communities prepare for, and respond to, the spread of COVID-19 in every way we can. To support our community response to this virus, we are expanding access to virtual urgent care options. Dignity Health is offering free virtual urgent care visits with a coupon code for patients experiencing mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19.


City of Long Beach Rapid Assessment Clinic and Drive-Through Testing Site 

  • The City of Long Beach launched a Rapid Assessment Clinic to provide medical assistance to people who might otherwise feel compelled to visit an emergency room for their medical conditions. Starting Tuesday April 7 drive-through appointment-only COVID-19 testing will be available for those who need it, in an area adjacent to the Rapid Assessment Clinic. Interested individuals should visit the City's COVID-19 testing page and answer several pre-screening questions. Testing will continue to be prioritized for individuals who are symptomatic, those who have underlying health conditions, or are 65 years or older.
Member News: Chamber Members are Open and Ready to Serve

Wells Fargo Open for Business Fund

  • Wells Fargo announced a $2.6 million small business recovery grant to Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) Pacific Coast Regional Small Business Development Corporation (PCR) and Genesis LA Economic Growth Corporation (Genesis LA) to help small businesses manage the economic effects of COVID-19 during the holiday season and beyond. Wells Fargo’s funding will help increase access to capital with low rate loans for diverse Los Angeles County small businesses that have been negatively impacted by the pandemic.
  • With $2.1M in funding from the Open For Business Fund, Pacific Coast Regional has established the People of Color Business Elevation Fund focused on helping Black and Brown small businesses across southern California recover. The People of Color Business Elevation Fund will provide low rate micro-disaster loans up to $50,000 to eligible and impacted diverse small businesses. Those interested in applying can apply now at https://pcr.lendwithspark.com/widget/leadframe/?version=16#step2. 
  • Genesis LA will deploy its $550,000 award to provide financial support to small businesses who are struggling to pay bills due to lower profit margins and higher expenses as a result of the pandemic. With support from Wells Fargo, Genesis LA will provide flexible and forgivable loans to minority led businesses across Los Angeles County. Small business owners interested can begin applying early 2021.

Environmental Construction Group; Precautionary and Emergency Sterilization Services

  • During this pandemic ECG has sterilized over 1 million square feet of business, warehouse, office and residential space in the greater Los Angeles, OC & SD Counties! 

    Since 2002 ECG has been providing professional decontamination services, and consulting on procedures to minimize the risk of spreading infections in work environments. The purpose is to neutralize infectious diseases usually caused by bacteria or viruses like Covid-19 spread by human to human contact with an infected surface, or airborne agents suspended in the air. Utilizing state-of-the-art SteraMist technologies, our team of qualified personnel has the expertise to provide turn-key services ranging from initial site assessments to complete micro-biologic decontamination. We use Binary Ionization Technology (BIT) which is EPA registered, hospital grade and non-toxic to decontaminate air and surfaces including high-tech electronic and delicate medical equipment.

    Chamber members receive a 10% discount!

    A+ BBB Rating.


Laserfiche Supports Community Hospital Long Beach Reopening With PPE and Electronic Health Records Software

  • Laserfiche — the leading global provider of intelligent content management business process automation — is supporting Community Hospital Long Beach through a multifaceted initiative that includes donations of personal protective equipment (PPE) and a Laserfiche Cloud solution to accelerate hiring and new patient onboarding.

F&L Racing Fuel

  • F&L Racing Fuel has shifted gears and is now selling hand sanitizer in efforts to help stop the spread of COVID-19. For every bottle of hand sanitizer sold, F&L is donating the gross profits to local homeless shelters to help support one of the most vulnerable communities during this time. With their sales in the first two weeks, they were able to donate their first check for $15,000 to the Long Beach Rescue Mission April 29th. F&L is dedicated to helping utilize their resources to help the local community during this time. Please do your part & help support by purchasing on their website: https://www.mil-specproducts.com/Products/handsanitizer. F&L Racing Fuels Hand Sanitizer is available in three convenient sizes, 2oz for on the go, 8oz for home and business use and by the gallon for making those refills quick and easy!

Su Casa Expanding Services During Safe At Home Quarantine 

  • Su Casa – Ending Domestic Violence has announced that it has joined Project Safe Haven, a collaborative effort by the Los Angeles Mayor’s Fund to shelter survivors of domestic violence. At a time when NBC news is reporting a 20% increase in domestic violence reports and shelters are reducing numbers of residents to allow for social distancing, a new approach was needed. Singer Rihanna joined forces with Twitter Chief Executive Jack Dorsey, and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti to help victims of domestic violence during the lock down period. Read Press Release

The BizFed Institute

  • The BizFed Institute has formed an unprecedented partnership with the LA Delegation of 39 CA Senators and Assemblymembers, Los Angeles County, the Hospital Association of Southern California (HASC), Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Los Angeles Locals, along with BizFed’s 195 business associations representing over 400,000 employers to locate and collect donations of much needed vital safely supplies to help protect workers throughout LA County and mitigate the spread of the virus. Donate Today Here!

Long Beach Post Shop: COVID-19 Masks and Face Coverings

  • The Long Beach Post, with the assistance of the City of Long Beach, has launched this marketplace for local makers and businesses to connect with people looking to purchase masks and face coverings. The Long Beach Post receives no commission from the sale of products sold through this marketplace. READ MORE

SoCalGas and Frontier Communications Support Diverse Business Enterprises

  • Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) and Frontier Communications will collaborate to lead a series of webinars throughout April with tips for diverse business enterprises seeking to earn utility contracts. Online sessions intended to help diverse businesses succeed during COVID-19 pandemic

Skills4Care is offering in-home childcare service to Essential Workers

  • In an effort to provide childcare solutions during this COVID-19 pandemic, Skills4Care, the Cambrian Homecare non-profit, is offering CalFLEXI by Pacific Gateway. The CalFLEXI program provides an online platform enabling you to book pre-vetted, qualified providers for your in-home childcare needs. Read More

South Coast AQMD Expediting Permits to Aid COVID-19 Efforts

Verizon Offers Relief to Customers

Queen Beach Printers - working and fulfilling commitments

Wells Fargo supports small business customers during COVID-19 crisis

YMCA of Greater Long Beach offers Day Camp for children of essential workers

Special Message from Athens Services

Ooma Office - can help businesses that stay open answer and make calls using their business number in a work from home or remote environment


Please refer to our media partners for the latest information and news on the coronavirus.

Links are included below


 

 

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